• Holly Keller

Partnering With A Title Insurance Agency: Tips, Tricks, Do’s and Don’t’s!

Updated: Jun 9

You may have heard of a title insurance agency, but you’re not exactly sure what it does, or why you should partner with a title insurance agency for your real estate needs.

First, and foremost, let’s define what’s covered by title insurance (which should explain why you need it): simply put, title insurance covers the difference between what the title says the land is, and what the land actually is. In other words, if there’s a deficiency in the title because of an unenforceable or invalid mortgage contract, or because or a violation or lien against the property, title insurance covers the deficiency.

Here, then, is a list of tips & tricks you should consider when partnering with a title insurance company:

  1. Some title companies favor lenders or Realtors, and may not work within your best interests when it comes to protecting the property. For that reason, it’s always within your best interest to work with an independent title company.

  2. When looking for a title company, make sure that they’re not only licensed, but that they belong to a legitimate state organization that represents other independent title insurance agents.

  3. Finally, but no less importantly, you should “shop around” before settling on one title insurance agency. Get price quotes from at least three different title agencies before settling on one — and make sure that you’re not only getting the best price, but the most value for that price.

For more information about Liberty Land Transfer, or to see how we can best serve your title insurance needs, contact us today.

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